Thank you Canada!

We've Now Given Away

We’re proud and thrilled to announce that not only have we achieved our campaign goal of giving away 35 million wildflower seeds, but far exceeded it! And while we’ve run out of seeds and the contest is over, please keep planting and creating a bee friendly world!

Helping is in our nature.

Help raise awareness by watching and sharing this video with #BringBacktheBees.

Want to plant your own wildflowers?

Some popular bee friendly wildflowers to get you started:

    • Poppy

    • Forget-me-not

    • Marigold

    • Dahlia

    • Aster

    • Hyssop

Let’s keep planting wildflowers and help the bees

  • Here are some expert tips from our partner

    Spring is the best time to sow seeds. Wait until the possibility of frost is over before sowing.

    Wildflowers will flourish in most soil. If grass or weeds are growing there now, so will wildflowers.

  • Aggressive weeds can take over your wildflower garden, so continue to weed the area, especially in the first year.

    In the fall, mow your wildflower garden at a high level and leave any clippings as they will have seeds in them.

    Wildflower seeds are light, so choose a less windy day for planting.

Why we need bees

  • ... is made possible by bees and other pollinators2, who spread the pollen that crops need to grow.

    That includes many of our favourite foods like apples, almonds, coffee, and of course, honey.

  • ... is made possible by bees and other pollinators1, who spread the pollen that crops need to grow.

    That includes many of our favourite foods like apples, almonds, coffee, and of course, honey.

SEEDS GIVEN AWAY

Why are bees disappearing?

  • Honeybees have thrived for 50 million years. So why have colonies recently started dying en masse? Renowned entomologist and bee specialist Marla Spivak reveals four reasons why, and what we can do to help in this Ted Talk.
  • Honeybees have thrived for 50 million years. So why have colonies recently started dying en masse? Renowned entomologist and bee specialist Marla Spivak reveals four reasons why, and what we can do to help in this Ted Talk.

Fun Bee Facts

  • The bee is the only insect that produces food eaten by man3.

  • The bee is the only insect that produces food eaten by man1.

  • Nature's most economical builders

    In 36 BC, Marcus Terentius Varro argued that honeycombs were the most practical structures around. Centuries later, Greek mathematician Pappus solidified the "honeycomb conjecture" by making the same claim4.

  • There are over 20,000 species of bees in the world3!

  • There are over 20,000 species of bees in the world1!

  • Life in colour

    Bees have good colour vision. That's why flowers are so showy. They especially like blue, purple, violet, white and yellow5.

  • Life in colour

    Bees have good colour vision. That's why flowers are so showy. They especially like blue, purple, violet, white and yellow2.

  • City
    stickers

    Bees love to live in urban settings where there are short flight paths and a variety of different plants and flowers to sample just as much as they love the country5.

  • Bees can
    recognize you

    Honeybees make out faces the same way we do. They take parts—like eyebrows, lips, and ears—and cobble them together to make out the whole face. It's called "configural processing," and it might help computer scientists improve face recognition technology4.

  • It takes one ounce of honey to fuel a bee's flight around the world3 !

  • It takes one ounce of honey to fuel a bee's flight around the world1 !

  • Bee species all have different tongue lengths that adapt to different flowers5.

  • Why the buzz?

    The honey bee’s wings stroke incredibly fast, about 200 beats per second, thus making their famous, distinctive buzz. A honey bee can fly for up to nine kilometers, and as fast as twenty five kilometers per hour3.

  • Bee species all have different tongue lengths that adapt to different flowers2.

  • Bee species all have different tongue lengths that adapt to different flowers5.

  • Why the buzz?

    The honey bee’s wings stroke incredibly fast, about 200 beats per second, thus making their famous, distinctive buzz. A honey bee can fly for up to nine kilometers, and as fast as twenty five kilometers per hour3.

  • Bee species all have different tongue lengths that adapt to different flowers2.

  • City
    stickers

    Bees love to live in urban settings where there are short flight paths and a variety of different plants and flowers to sample just as much as they love the country5.

  • Bees can
    recognize you

    Honeybees make out faces the same way we do. They take parts—like eyebrows, lips, and ears—and cobble them together to make out the whole face. It's called "configural processing," and it might help computer scientists improve face recognition technology4.

  • It takes one ounce of honey to fuel a bee's flight around the world3 !

  • It takes one ounce of honey to fuel a bee's flight around the world1 !

Looking for the best and brightest vegetable and flower selections for the upcoming season? Click here to order your FREE Vesey's catalogues.

Plant wildflower seeds to help

#BringBackTheBees